Our Denomination

About the Presbyterian Church USA
Through the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Spirit, we trust in the one true God, the Holy One of Israel, whom alone we worship and serve.

God comes to us in free and undeserved favor in the person of Jesus Christ who lived, died, and rose for us that we might belong to God and serve Christ in the world. Following Jesus, Presbyterians are engaged in the world and in seeking thoughtful solutions to the challenges of our time.

Presbyterians affirm that God comes to us with grace and love in the person of Jesus Christ, who lived, died, and rose for us so that we might have eternal and abundant life in him. As Christ’s disciples, called to ministry in his name, we seek to continue his mission of teaching the truth, feeding the hungry, healing the broken, and welcoming strangers. God sends the Holy Spirit to dwell within us, giving us the energy, intelligence, imagination, and love to be Christ’s faithful disciples in the world.

More than two million people call the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) their spiritual home. Worshiping in 10,000 Presbyterian congregations throughout the United States, they engage the communities in which they live and serve with God’s love.

The symbol of the Presbyterian church is a seal designed by Malcom Grear for the church's reunion celebration in 1983. In this design there are multiple images that represent the main elements in the Reformed tradition.


The main section of the seal is a cross representing the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus. A descending dove is over the cross. The dove was present at the baptism of Jesus and is a symbol of the Holy Spirit. Some people also see the body of the dove shaped like a fish, an early symbol of the Christian faith.

Under the dove, you can see an open book, representing the importance of the Bible, God's word, which we study and preach. Under the book, the cupped portion of that level might represent the two sacraments we practice in the chalice used for Holy Communion and a baptismal font used for Baptism.

Beneath the book you can also see the outline of a pulpit, which represents the importance of preaching and hearing God's word in worship.

Two flames on the sides of the cross represent the flames of the Holy Spirit which are depicted in many scenes in the Bible, like the burning bush and the tongues of flame that appeared at Pentecost.

The three elements of the cross and flames represent the Trinity, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

The elements of our seal remind us that our faith has a wide diversity of symbols, representing the many ways God has spoken --and continues to speak--to the world that God created, redeemed, and sustains in covenantal relationship.